Are you wired to teach? Pretend you’re a teacher in these situations. What would you do? Decide if you agree or disagree with the action taken.

  1. The school year has just begun. Alex, who fell short of expectations last year, is once again in your class. You help Alex by allowing him to set his own realistic goals and making sure they aren’t too aggressive, as you don’t want Alex to set himself up for failure.

    Answer

  2. Pat is a friendly student who rarely acts up in class. Unfortunately, Pat repeatedly fails tests or doesn’t complete the assigned homework. Instead of punishing him, you recognize Pat’s efforts and engage his family to help Pat with his assignments.

    Answer

  3. Yesterday, Casey arrived to class a few minutes after the bell rang. Today, she arrived late again. You address her repeated tardiness privately, describing the rule and consequence for repeated tardiness. Then you immediately enforce the consequence with Casey.

    Answer

  4. Jamie appears to be confused by today’s lesson plan. When you call on Jamie to answer a question, she provides an incorrect response. To protect Jamie from embarrassment and help Jamie better understand the lesson, you move on to another student who appears confident they have the correct response.

    Answer

  5. Your class has completed an assessment test and 25 percent of the class has fallen short of expectations. Rather than focusing on the actions of the students, you approach the situation by thinking about how your actions may be contributing to the students’ lack of progress.

    Answer

  6. You are halfway through the school year and, despite your best efforts, Taylor is unable to read. You help Taylor by holding him back a grade – after all, you need more than half a school year to teach a student to read.

    Answer

  7. Students are given one month to complete a simple extra credit assignment. They may turn in the assignment at any time, but you make it clear that no late assignments will be accepted. Lizzie is absent from class the day the assignment is due, but turns in the assignment the following day. You accept the assignment, but only provide Lizzie with partial credit.

    Answer

  8. Reese and Jessie are your favorite students. Reese is an outgoing student who excels in athletics, while Jessie is a quiet student who excels in academics. Showing Reese and Jessie that you care would make it obvious they are your favorite students, so you are reluctant to show interest or concern outside of class.

    Answer

  9. Salma is a new student in your class. On her first day of school, she is wearing a hijab – the head covering traditionally worn by Muslim women. A few minutes into class, it’s clear that students are distracted and are talking about the hijab when they should be paying attention. You halt the classroom activity, bring all students together in a circle and spend the lesson discussing diversity and acceptance.

    Answer

  10. You are passing out graded tests, when Harper disrupts the class. Harper believes that you have incorrectly marked one of the answers as wrong. After you review his test again, you realize that he is correct. You admit that you were wrong in front of the class, apologize for your mistake and let Harper know you’re proud of his hard work on the test.

    Answer

If you got 5 or more correct – congratulations, you are clearly wired to teach! Your answers indicate that you know many of the characteristics of a highly effective teacher.

If you got less than 5 correct – you have demonstrated awareness of several characteristics of highly effective teachers. Explore the NExT website to learn more about highly effective teachers and for resources to help you on the journey to becoming a great teacher.

Sources